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in latin america, and it will have huge consequences for the western hemisphere and the world. >>> also, if you thought black friday was crazy, check out the sales in europe. i'll explain. but first here's my take. >>> it's thanksgiving weekend, america. time to reflect on our good fortune. it's also a time that most americans think about the unusual origins of the united states, a land of immigrants. we see o ourselves as special in this way, and we are, except that we're not quite as exceptional as we think anymore. something fascinating has happened over the last two decades. other countries have been transforming themselves into immigrant societies, adopting many of america's best ideas, even improving on them. if you watched our immigration special back in june or read my piece in "time" magazine, you would know that canada and australia both have a higher percentage of people who are foreign born compared to the united states. in fact, on this dimension, america, which once led the world, looks like most western countries. germany and france, for example, have about the same perce
are fascinating and a little scary. it might well be the future of politics in america. >>> also, sea barriers, wetlands, futuristic construction materials. what is the answer to climate change and how can we all adapt to this new normal of hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods? i'll talk to jeffrey sachs and "time" magazine's brian walsh. >>> and why is there such an antiqued way of voting? i'll take a look. but first here's my take. growing up in the india in the 1960s and '70s, ales thought of america as the future. it was the place where the newest technology, the best gadgets, the latest fads seemed to originate. seemingly exotic political causes, women's liberation, gay rights, ageism, always seemed to get their start on the streets of the united states orthopedic in the courts and legislatures. for me, tuesday's election brought back that sense of america as the future. the presidential race has been discussed as one that was about nothing with no message or mandate, but i don't think that's true. put aside the re-election of barack obama and consider what else happened this week. three sta
to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. it's me? alright emma, i know it's not your favorite but it's time for your medicine, okay? you ready? one, two, three. [ both ] ♪ emma, emma bo-bemma ♪ banana-fana-fo-femma ♪ fee-fi-fo-femma ♪ em-ma very good sweety, how do you feel? good. yeah? you did a really good job, okay? [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. at meineke i have options... like oil changes starting at $19.95. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> and we are back with bob rubin and paul o'neill. two former secretaries of the treasury from both sides of the aisle. i say in my opening commentary, paul o'neill says if you want to provide subsidies for people, write them a check. why do it in this hidden way through the tax code which first of all is permanent and perpetual and secondly, you're not being up front about it. >> two comments if i may, fareed. one thing it's not permanent. you can always
of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. in two days america will pick its president for the next four years. we'll take two different looks at this moment in time. first a global perspective. we've assembled experts from europe, middle east, and asia to tell us how the rest of the world sees this election. then i have a panel of distinguished historians, walter isa isaacson, sean wilentz and edmund morris to look at an eye to the past. what do past campaigns and past presidents tell us about this nail-biter? also americans might be anxious to learn tuesday's results of the chinese are even more anxious, perhaps, to learn who their new leaders will be, why they might have more at stake than we do. but first here's my take. whoever wins the election on tuesday, on wednesday either barack obama or mitt romney will have to start worrying about the same urgent challenge, how to stop the united states from falling over the fiscal cliff. this is, of course, the second cliff hanger that the united states has faced in two years, the first being the debt ceiling deba
behind that. >> will any of this improve america's employment picture? >> yes. for the very reasons paul said. if you have a sound fiscal program that dealt with our long-term imperative, then i believe, just as paul said, that it would increase business confidence significantly both because right now there's great uncertainty about future policy and economic conditions and because there's real concern about whether or government can function. in addition, if you properly functioned it you could have a moderately up front service. i think it's the most important thing you could do. >> bob rubin, paul o'neill, glad to have you on. >>> up next, "what in the world." why the next policy crisis may come from an unlikely source. i'll explain it. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about your old 401(k). tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 you know, the one that's been lying around. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k) to a schwab ira, and we'll help you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 find new ways to make your money work harder. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so if you're ready to teach your old 401(k)
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)